About the School

Storrs Hall at night

The School of Nursing’s mission is to educate nursing scholars, clinicians, leaders, and health care consumers through the generation and dissemination of new knowledge developed in innovative scholarship to foster interprofessional evidence-based practice with the goal of advancing the health of individuals, communities, and systems, both locally and globally.

UConn’s School of Nursing has a timeless commitment to wellness and works to provide the exceptional education needed to succeed in this rapidly evolving profession. For 80 years, UConn School of Nursing has led the way using high-tech simulation labs and technology-driven programs to prepare nurses to serve diverse populations in a variety of clinical settings.

The interprofessional curricula across our five nursing programs emphasize innovation, leadership, scholarship, evidence-based practice, and research. All our programs are supported by highly qualified faculty, many of whom are internationally renowned experts in their areas of specialty. Adjunct faculty members from a variety of health care agencies within Connecticut serve as clinical experts who share firsthand knowledge of today’s medical challenges.

All of UConn’s School of Nursing laboratory facilities provide undergraduate students a location to transfer knowledge from theory to practice, as well as an environment to practice advanced health assessment skills. These facilities, combined with expert faculty knowledge, secure UConn’s place as a forward-thinking, research-intensive university.

Our Praxis

The philosophy of the School of Nursing is directed by six guiding principles, affirmed in 2019

Professionalism in behavior, presentation, and conduct
Respectful of the richness and diversity of others and of self
Accountability for my actions
eXcellence in scholarship, practice, teaching, and service
Integrity, inquisitiveness, and innovation
Service to the profession and the community

Consistent with the metaparadigm of nursing, each person is viewed as a unique dynamic individual interconnected with others and continually interacting and responding with the environment.

Environment is the context in which the human experience of health occurs.

Humans have culturally derived values and beliefs that give meaning to life and health.

Health is a non-linear entity characterized as a matter of personal meaning and interpretation; an ever-changing quality of living and dying influenced by myriad sociocultural, spiritual, economic, physical, developmental and psychological variables.

Nursing practice is the convergence of caring elements, ways of knowing, person, health and environment.

Policy on Zero Tolerance for Disrespect

The University of Connecticut School of Nursing Faculty introduced and approved a policy on zero tolerance for disrespect on Sept. 28, 2020. Updates to the policy were approved on April 11, 2022:

Applies To:

Students

Policy Statement:

The University of Connecticut, School of Nursing is committed to maintaining and strengthening an environment founded on respect. Disrespect of others based on personal characteristics, including race, color, religion, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, disability, national origin or citizenship status, is antithetical to the standards and ideals of our school community and of the profession of nursing. It is a violation of the second guiding principle of the school’s philosophy, PRAXIS, and of the first provision of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics.

Enforcement:

Any student believed to have disrespected others based on personal characteristics, including race, color, religion, gender identity or expression, disability, national origin or citizenship status, shall be provided a written description of the alleged violation(s), with a copy to the Dean. Then the University’s Procedures on Student Discipline, Dismissal and Appeal Process from Professional/Clinical Programs (“Procedures”) will be followed but the alleged violation will go directly to a hearing body. The hearing body will consist of three members. Any student found by the hearing body to have violated the second guiding principle of the School’s philosophy, PRAXIS, and the first provision of the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics by disrespecting others based on personal characteristics, including race, color, religion, gender identity or expression, disability, national origin or citizenship status, will be dismissed from the program.